Ken Sarni

Getting More from Less in Defined Benefit Plans: Three Levers for a Low-Return World
Source: Pension Research Council

 

As global interest rates hover near historic lows, defined benefit pension plan sponsors must grapple with the prospect of lower investment returns. This paper examines three levers that can enhance portfolio outcomes in a low-return world. The levers include: increased contributions; reduced investment costs; and increased portfolio risk. We use portfolio simulations based on a stochastic asset class forecasting model to evaluate each lever according to two criteria—its magnitude of impact and the certainty that this impact will be realized. Our analysis indicates that increased contributions have the greatest and most certain impact. Reduced costs have a more modest, but equally certain impact. Increased risk can deliver a significant impact, but with the least certainty.

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Moving? Check the State Taxes First
Source: Center for Retirement Research

New Jersey’s retirement income exclusion for couples leaped from $20,000 to $100,000 in 2016.  Minnesota and South Carolina now have income tax deductions for retired military. And Rhode Island started exempting the first $15,000 of retirees’ income from the state’s income tax.

State taxes are one piece of the financial puzzle to consider when retirees – or Millennials – are thinking about moving to reduce their living costs, find a job or friendlier climate, or be close to the grandchildren.

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Welcome Dolton Fire Pension Fund to IPPFA
Source: IPPFA

Welcome Dolton Fire Pension Fund to IPPFA.

 

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Welcome Collinsville Fire Pension Fund to IPPFA
Source: IPPFA

Welcome Collinsville Fire Pension Fund to IPPFA.

 

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What’s Happening to U.S. Mortality Rates?
Source: Center for Retirement Research

The brief’s key findings are:

  • Mortality rates, which determine life expectancy, are a key factor in cost projections for the Social Security program.
  • Mortality rates consistently improve over time, but the pace of progress varies by year, by age, and by socioeconomic status.
  • Over the past 40 years, progress has been driven by medical advances, better access to health care, and a decline in smoking, partly offset by rising obesity.
  • Looking to the future, mortality improvements will continue to depend on the same drivers, but the net effects could play out differently.
  • The key debate is whether the future will mirror the past, with average rates of improvement of about 1 percent, or whether the pace of progress will slow.

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Welcome Centreville Police Pension Fund to IPPFA
Source: IPPFA

Welcome Centreville Police Pension Fund to IPPFA.

 

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37 States That Don’t Tax Social Security Benefits
Source: The Motley Fool

Although the IRS imposes income tax on the Social Security benefits of certain senior citizens, the majority of states don’t. In fact, only 13 states tax Social Security benefits, and many of these have more generous income thresholds than the IRS.

Here’s a list of the states that won’t touch your Social Security benefits, and where this information fits into the overall picture of a state’s tax-friendliness.

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The Impact of Raising Children on Retirement Security
Source: The Center for Retirement Research

The brief’s key findings are:

  • The cost of raising children could make it harder for parents to save for retirement.
  • On the other hand, if parents offset child-rearing expenses by spending less on themselves, they could still end up well prepared in retirement.
  • The analysis uses the National Retirement Risk Index to look at what impact children actually have on retirement preparedness.
  • The results show that children reduce household wealth and moderately increase the likelihood of retirement risk for older working households.

 

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They’re called Save Our Pensions. Here’s why many Kentucky retirees don’t trust them
Source: Lexington Herald Leader

It took less than 24 hours after a government-paid consultant offered radical recommendations to fix Kentucky’s ailing pension systems for a shadowy group called Save Our Pensions to launch its first online video ad.

The ad, like the recommendations, was drab and drastic, threatening millions in cuts to education and health care if the legislature does not solve the pension crisis, presumably by slashing pension benefits for public workers and retirees.

“Save our pensions,” the ad concluded. “Save education and health care. Urge your representative and senator to support pension reform.”

It’s the “our” in Save Our Pensions that some government workers and retirees take issue with.

Read more here: http://www.kentucky.com/news/politics-government/article172850171.html#storylink=cpy

 

 

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Bailey Childers talks about the retirement crisis in the U.S.
Source: Leavenworth Times

 

Bailey Childers is executive director of the National Public Pension Coalition. In this Quick 5 interview, she talks about the retirement crisis in the U.S.

1. Bailey, the National Public Pension Coalition recently released a report titled Why Pensions Matter. What did the report examine and what were some of the findings?
The report looks at the long history of public pensions in the United States from their origins in the late 19th century up through the present day. Public pensions have provided a reliable source of retirement security for teachers, firefighters, and other public employees for more than a century. Unfortunately, the shift to 401(k) retirement plans in the private sector over the past 30 years has been detrimental to most working families. It is becoming increasingly clear that 401(k)s have failed to meet the retirement income needs of most working people. This, coupled with nearly half of working Americans receiving no retirement plan through work has left us with a retirement security crisis in America.

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